Mt. Carmel

Also known as Antelope-Nose, Har Karmel, Holy Headland, Jebel Kurmul, Mar Elyas, Mount of User, Rosh-Kedesh

Mount Carmel from the south

Geographical Significance

Here the southern side of Mt. Carmel near the coast can be seen.  Mt. Carmel was most significant in ancient times as a barrier to traffic along the coastal plain.  The 1500-foot high limestone mountain impeded armies and merchants traveling to the Jezreel Valley. 

 

Symbol of Beauty

Biblically, Mt. Carmel is referenced most often as a symbol of beauty and fertility.  To be given the "splendor of Carmel" was to be blessed indeed (Isa 35:2).  Solomon praised his beloved: "your head crowns you like Mount Carmel" (Song 7:5).  But for Carmel to wither was a sign of devastating judgment (Nahum 1:4).

Mount Carmel south of Wadi Oren

 

Muhraqa on Mount Carmel from south

Elijah's Contest

This is probably the best view of the area of Elijah's contest, assuming tradition is correct.  The monastery of Muhraqa is at the top of the hill, but tradition places the contest slightly lower near a spring.  The crowds of Israelites would have filled the spacious territory around to see whose God would win.

 

Elijah's Victory

The statue at the Carmelite monastery reflects the Lord's victory over the prophets of Baal.  Shortly after fire came down from heaven and consumed the sacrifice, altar and even the water, Elijah had the prophets of Baal slaughtered at the Brook Kishon - something which should have happened long before!

Statue of Elijah at Muhraqa on Mount Carmel

 

Jokneam pass through Mount Carmel

Passes of Mt. Carmel

Because Mt. Carmel sits astride the International Highway (sometimes called the Via Maris), three passes through the mountain became significant routes of travel in the ancient world.  This photo shows the "Jokneam pass" from the vantage point of Tell Jokneam.  Because of the narrowness of the passes, they were relatively easy to guard.

 

Druze Community

Today two Druze villages are situated on Mount Carmel.  The Druze religion is an offshoot of the Islam faith from about AD 1000.  The Druze people speak Arabic, live also in the hills of Galilee and the Golan Heights, and have good relations with the Jews of Israel.  They are often persecuted by Muslims.  

Daliyat el-Carmel

Related Websites

Mount Carmel (Walking in Their Sandals)  Gives easy-to-read information on the location, biblical significance, etc.  Features links to photographs and on-line scripture references.

Carmel (Christian Travel Study Program)  Summarizes the geographical setting, as well as the biblical importance of this site.

Mount Carmel (Daily Bible Study)  General information about the area with links to related topics.

Mount Carmel (New Advent)  Offers the reader an extended history of the site (presented from the catholic viewpoint). 

Mount Carmel Photos (Personal Page, Peter Blackburn)  Features nice photographs with excellent identifying captions.

Haifa ~ Mount Carmel (Camp S'dei Chemed International)  Gives an interesting, somewhat mystical history of the region from a distinctly Jewish perspective.

Mt. Carmel, Israel (Order of Nazorean Essenes)  Contains many unique photographs, focusing on traditional sites, along with some links of interest.

A Brief History of Mount Carmel (Baha'i World Centre)  Recounts the history of the mountain, giving brief attention to many different historical periods, both ancient and modern.  Pictures are limited to sites of Baha'i interest.

The Carmelites (Gems in Israel)  Offers insight into the Carmelite community, an order of monks who originated on the slopes of Mt. Carmel.  This group maintains the monastery situated on one peak of the mountain.