fbpx

“Archaeologists working in the Wadi Al-Nasab region of the Sinai have uncovered the headquarters of a [copper and turquois] mining operation that dates back to the Middle Kingdom.

“After war and insurgency kept them away from Iraq for decades, European archaeologists are making an enthusiastic return in search of millennia-old cultural treasures.”

The only fresco preserved from the Greek classical world is in Paestum in southern Italy.

A newly restored gladiator helmet is on display at the Pompeii exhibition at the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh.

A new archaeological institute will be opening in Gaziantep in southeastern Turkey.

In the first of a two-part article, Deb Hurn looks at the evidence for the location of Sodom.

The BAS Scholars Series begins on March 10 with Mark Goodacre speaking about the resurrection. This is the first of a quarterly virtual lecture series that will include Aren Maeir, Jodi Magness, and Joan Taylor.

Zoom lecture on Jan 22: “Modernity Meets Mesopotamia: An Ancient Assyrian Palace in Los Angeles.” I’ve driven by this outlet mall many times and wondered what the story was…

Christopher Rollston discusses the alleged Isaiah bulla on the Biblical World podcast.

In his final post on Paul’s shipwreck on Malta, Carl Rasmussen suggests where the ship ran aground.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Wayne Stiles, Alexander Schick

Share:

Bob Rognlien has created a 12-episode teaching video series which includes hundreds of photos, maps, reconstructions, and illustrations based on his book, Recovering the Way.

Shelley Wachsmann writes about the challenges and opportunities of deep submergence archaeology.

Smithsonian Magazine has a well-illustrated piece on Assur, one-time capital of ancient Assyria.

New release from Carta: Under the Yoke of Ashur: The Assyrian Century in the Land of Israel, by Mordechai Cogan

The recordings are now available from “The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Second Public Conference” held online in June 2021.

Walking the Text has just released the 3rd edition of “The #1 Mistake Most Everyone Makes Reading the Bible.” You can get a free copying by clicking the button to “join Walking the Text.”

“Live Science makes predictions about what archaeologists will uncover in the new year.” Only the last, regarding Qumran, may be of interest to our readers.

The latest issue of ‘Atiqot is now online.

Andy Cook and Cyndi Parker will be speaking in Warner Robins on Feb 4-5 on the topic of “Discovering the World Jesus Knew.”

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Alexander Schick, Arne Halbakken, Baruch Kvasnica

Share:

Excavations revealed an ancient synagogue in Side near Antalya (biblical Attalia), a city where Paul preached, albeit six centuries after his visit.

“A team of researchers has successfully digitally unwrapped the mummified body of the pharaoh Amenhotep I, who lived around 3,500 years ago.”

Mark Boslough claims that the Sodom cosmic airburst theory has significant shortcomings.

108-year-old Sumerologist credits Istanbul museum for long career.”

“A digital model of Babylon is under development.”

Virtual workshop on January 11 at the Albright Institute: The Religious Soundscape of the Holy Land: From the Crusades to the Late Ottoman Empire

Webinar on January 20: “The Not-So-Innocents Abroad: The Beginnings of American Biblical Archaeology,” by Rachel Hallote

Carl Rasmussen writes about an anchor stock at Malta with the name of an Egyptian deity on it.

John DeLancey and Kyle Keimer give a virtual tour of highlights in the archaeological wing of the Israel Museum (part 1 of 4).

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Alexander Schick, Arne Halbakken, Charles Savelle

Share:

Two statues believed to be dating back to 2,000 years were unearthed during excavation works in the ancient Roman city of Blaundus in western Turkey.”

Five marble statue heads from the Hellenistic and Roman periods were discovered in excavations at Cnidus (Knidos).

A 4,000-year-old mound and an architectural structure inside it have been unearthed after the water level of Atatürk Dam receded 15 meters in the southeastern province of Adıyaman.”

“The Temple of Venus and Roma, located in the Roman Forum opposite the Colosseum, has undergone a €2.5 million restoration sponsored by the luxury fashion house Fendi.”

Biblical Archaeology Review has posted its annual list of dig opportunities for 2022. The Biblical Archaeology Society is offering dig scholarships of $2,000.

The first-ever Spring Bible and Archaeology Fest will be held on April 2 and 3.

“Left in ruins by jihadists, Iraq’s once-celebrated Mosul museum and its 2,500-year-old treasures are being given a second life.”

Austen Henry Layard, renowned as the excavator of Nimrud, used his archaeological fame to catapult him into a career of politics and diplomacy.

The National Library of Israel has a new section on its website to share manuscripts from St. Catherine’s Monastery and related materials.

The final reports for the Tall Zirā‘a / Gadara Region Project have now been published. The volumes are also available in pdf format for free.

New exhibition at New York University: Pompeii in Color: The Life of Roman Painting (Jan 26 to May 29).

BBC Radio episode on the Hittites: “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the empire based in the Land of Hatti during the Late Bronze Age, in modern Turkey, and the discoveries there over the last century.”

Carl Rasmussen begins a series on anchor stocks discovered at Malta and their possible relationship to Paul’s shipwreck.

Lectures from La Sierra University’s recent Archaeology Discovery Weekend are now online, including these two by Mark Wilson:

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Charles Savelle, Explorator

Share:

A cache of 13,000 inscribed potsherds from the Roman and Byzantine eras have been discovered in Sohag, Egypt.

New discoveries have come to light at Pompeii in the House of the Library.

An article in Haaretz contrasts an ancient Roman doll with the modern Barbie.

A team of scientists believe they have a new understanding of the Antikythera mechanism.

The US has returned 200 antiquities stolen from Italy, including items seized from the Fordham Museum and the Getty Museum.

A new museum of Roman antiquities opened in Narbonne, France last week.

Lonely Planet names their 10 ten museums in Istanbul.

Online exhibit: Mesopotamia: An Intimate Look at Some Extraordinary Objects from an Exhibition at the Getty Villa

Clay tablets from the library of Ashurbanipal reveal an ancient Assyrian remedy for hair loss (subscription req’d).

The recorded presentations are now online for the conference on “Perspectives on the Ramesside Military System.”

Dirk Obbink owes Hobby Lobby a full refund for the $7 million of ancient papyri that he sold them.

Nearly a million tourists have visited the ancient city of Dara in southeastern Turkey this year.

New release: Edgar J. Goodspeed, America’s First Papyrologist, by Todd M. Hickey and James G. Keenan

Glenn Corbett is leading a Jordan Seminar at the Dead Sea in April.

Carl Rasmussen has begun a series on the shipwreck of Paul on Malta. He is also leading a trip to Malta, Sicily, and Italy in the spring.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Keith Keyser, Explorator

Share:

The first example of Roman crucifixion in northern Europe has been discovered. The skeleton of a man with a nail through his right heel was uncovered in a cemetery near Cambridge that dates to the 3rd or 4th century AD. The underlying article, published by British Archaeology, is available in pdf format.

Archaeologists working at the Temple of Hatshepsut in Luxor have discovered hundreds of items in an ancient garbage dump.

Two more mummies with tongues wrapped in golden foil have been discovered in Egypt.

Kathleen Martinez has spent the last 15 years determined to find Cleopatra’s tomb.

A new study suggests ancient Egyptian elites drank thick porridge-like beer.

Leather scale armor from the Neo-Assyrian empire has been discovered in China.

Archaeological work is being carried out in Iraq by a number of foreign teams.

One of the world’s largest collectors of ancient art has surrendered 180 looted antiquities. Nearly 50 of those will be returned to Greece soon.

A tablet with the Epic of Gilgamesh has been returned to Iraq after being looted from a museum during the 1991 war.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day report for November’s stories.

Carl Rasmussen has posted some photos of the new “Museum in the Istanbul Airport.”

William J. Fulco died in late November.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Richard Bauckham, Paleojudaica, Explorator

Share: