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Remains discovered at Herculaneum have led an archaeologist to compare the eruption of Mount Vesuvius to the WWII bomb at Hiroshima.

A large Roman villa complex with a mosaic depicting scenes from The Iliad has been uncovered in Britain.

Two Late Bronze tombs excavated in Hala Sultan Tekke in Cyprus have revealed more than 500 objects, including gold jewelry and gemstones.

A 1,600-year-old steelyard weight has been discovered during the ongoing excavations in the ancient city of Hadrianopolis” in northern Turkey.

Carl Rasmussen recently visited Sardis and photographed some of the changes being made to the site.

Underwater archaeology is thriving in Turkey, with 10 underwater excavations carried out this year alone.

The Greek Reporter has a story on Veria (Berea in the New Testament) which is also known as “Little Jerusalem.”

The latest episode on the Greece Declassified podcast considers whether the Hittites were an influence on Homer.

Now online: The Karkemish 3D Visualization Project

A new exhibition entitled “Child-friendly: Growing up in ancient Rome” opened recently in Florence, Italy.

Carolyn Wilke has written “a brief scientific history of glass” for Smithsonian Magazine.

Owen Jarus explains why the Egyptians stopped building pyramids.

Gil Davis provides a short history of the rise of silver coinage.

The world’s largest brick-built arch, the sixth-century Arch of Ctesiphon in Iraq, is now being restored.

The Nineveh Medical Encyclopaedia “represents the world’s first standardised, structured and systematised handbook on therapeutic medicine.”

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Explorator, Ted Weis

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“An ancient seal thought to belong to a Hittite prince and an ancient cuneiform tablet, both dating back over three millennia, were discovered in Turkey’s southern Hatay province.”

An iron face mask that would have been worn by an accomplished member of the Roman cavalry some 1,800 years ago has been unearthed in northern central Turkey.”

A study in the Temple of Hatshepsut reveals the production process for the reliefs, including the role of apprentices.

“Archaeologists conducting works at the Temple of Hatshepsut have made new discoveries in a subterranean tomb.”

Egypt has celebrated the reopening of the Avenue of the Sphinxes.

The Grand Egyptian Museum continues to receive artifacts, including 52 monumental pieces and 16 from King Tut’s treasures.

AramcoWorld has a series on spice migrations, including articles on ginger, cumin, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and cinnamon.

Russia has begun the long process of restoring the ancient Arch of Triumph in Palmyra after it was destroyed by evil people.

A fortress from the empire of the Medes has been discovered in northeastern Iran.

Two spectacular gold Persian reliefs, once owned by the Shah of Iran, will be auctioned by Christies on December 8.

Greek City Times has a review of the 18 World Heritage Sites in Greece.

A 2,000-year-old mosaic that once belonged to Caligula and disappeared during World War II was recovered in New York City after it served as a coffee table for 50 years.

Italy has launched a cultural streaming platform.

The New Yorker has a feature story on the latest discoveries at Pompeii.

It’s apparently not OK for American tourists to break into the Colosseum at night to drink beer.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Charles Savelle, Explorator

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Archaeologists in Egypt have found proof that they are excavating a rare ancient sun temple, the third ever found and the first to be uncovered in 50 years.”

After a ten-year closure, Egypt has begun plans to restore the Aswan Museum on Elephantine Island.

Saudi Arabia has opened the Nabatean site of Hegra to foreign tourists for the first time ever. This detailed article about Petra’s little sister includes many beautiful photos.

Four known Mycenaean corbel arch bridges in the vicinity of Mycenae and Arkadiko villages in Greece are considered to be some of the world’s oldest bridges. Two of them are still in operation and have been so for at least 3,000 years.”

Lina Zeldovich has written the best article I’ve ever read on bathroom practices of ancient Romans.

Now online: “Propaganda, Power, and Perversion of Biblical Truths: Coins Illustrating the Book of Revelation,” by Gordon Franz

It is interesting to see the Tehran Times run a story about Susa without ignoring its role biblical history. (The Bible is effectively outlawed in Iran, and all websites related to the Bible, including this one, cannot be accessed.)

The Biblical Archaeology Society has announced its 2021 Publication Awards Winners.

“Holly Beers and David deSilva discuss life in the first century with Biblical World host Lynn Cohick. Holly and David both wrote novels that explore life on the ground in Ephesus, giving readers a unique opportunity to experience Paul’s world in a very personal way.”

HT: Agade, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Andy Cook

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“The Egyptian-German mission has uncovered a collection of decorated blocks and fragments from the King Nactanebo [Nectanebo] I temple at the Matariya archaeological site in Heliopolis.”

A perfectly intact room that was lived in by slaves has been discovered in a suburb of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.” There is a 1-minute video here.

Archaeologists have discovered an latrine in the ancient theater of Izmir (biblical Smyrna), probably intended for use by actors.

“New excavations at the site of Blaundus in western Turkey are shedding light on the burial practices of ancient Asia Minor.”

Hurriyet Daily News has a short story on the use of healing bowls in antiquity.

Excavations of the Mycenean necropolis of ancient Rhypes has revealed various assemblages of grave goods and bronze swords.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day roundup of archaeological discoveries throughout the country in October, including the discovery of a 1st century altar at Alexandria Troas.

Giorgia Baldacci explains how clues from the cultural context of the Phaistos Disc support its authenticity and help to date it to 1750 BC.

George Athas discusses the intertestamental period on the Undeceptions podcast.

Microsoft has teamed up with the Greek government to digitally preserve ancient Olympia.

The Roman denarius has influenced currency throughout the Mediterranean world for the last two thousand years.

Rome’s Barberini Mithraeum, a mysterious cavern dating to the third century AD, is to reopen to visitors every second and fourth Saturday of the month, from 13 November.”

The 23rd season of excavations has begun at the site of ancient Ecbatana, capital of the Medes.

Upcoming trips of interest with Tutku Tours:

  • In Paul’s Footsteps in Turkey, with Mark Wilson (Apr-May 2022)
  • By Sea & Land: Paul’s Journey to Rome, with Charl Rasmussen and Glen Thompson (Apr-May 2022)
  • Seven Churches of Revelation and John of Patmos (Jay-June 2022)
  • Greece & Turkey: The Cradle of Christianity, with Mark Fairchild (July 2022)
  • Paul at Illyricum, with Mark Wilson (Sept 2022)
  • Sailing Acts: The Seaports and Sailing Routes of Paul, with Linford and Janet Stutzman (Sept 2022)

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Explorator

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“Archaeologists in Turkey have discovered 400 rock-cut chamber tombs that date to 1,800 years ago and make up part of one of the largest rock-cut chamber tomb necropolises in the world.”

There is controversy over a renovation plan for the Bodrum Museum which would relocate the famous shipwrecks of the Museum of Underwater Archaeology in order to convert the space into a mosque.

The ancient city of Dolichiste was a thriving Lycian trading hub until it was partially submerged in the Byzantine period.

The tombs of gladiators in Ephesus shed light on our knowledge of the ancient warriors.

An Italian archaeologist who has been excavating in Turkey for 30 years is ready to retire.

“During the excavation of the now-famous northwest corner of Rameses III’s fortress from the first half of the 12th century BCE, archaeologists unexpectedly came across two more fortress walls covering each other.”

New exhibit at the Art Museum of the University of Memphis: “Writing in Three Dimensions: Myth and Metaphor in Ancient Egypt,” through November 29.

Personal letters provide insight into the lives of ancient Egyptians.

Archaeologists have made what they are calling a “sensational” new find with the discovery of a skeleton a step away from the sea at Herculaneum.

A Lebanese official has been caught with antiquities looted from Syrian museums in his office.

“Escape to the past and explore true crime in antiquity during a free week-long online experience of the Getty Villa Museum’s annual College Night.”

Leon Mauldin has recently returned from a tour of Greece and Turkey, and he shares photos of Assos and Corinth.

Thomas Parker, director of several archaeological projects in Jordan, passed away suddenly last month.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Ted Weis, A.D. Riddle, Paleojudaica, Explorator, BibleX

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“Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed a collection of ancient tools that were used in religious rituals from the Temple of the Pharaohs (Boto) in Kafr El-Sheikh governorate north of Cairo.

The tomb of King Djoser in Saqqara has been reopened after restoration.

“A mass grave uncovered in Sidon, Lebanon, has shed new light on the Crusades and on the cruelty of medieval warfare.”

The United Nations announced that a 3,500-year-old tablet containing the Epic of Gilgamesh was returned this week to Iraq.

Most of Iran’s 746 museums have reopened after being closed due to Covid.

Istanbul’s Hisart Live History Museum covers a wide range of historical periods and features a large collection of diorama art.

“A team of Polish archaeologists in Nea Paphos, Cyprus have unearthed a 1,500-year-old two-sided amulet depicting a palindrome inscription written in ancient Greek.”

A digital interactive guide has been launched to provide visitors with information about the 205 archaeological museums in Greece.

Zoom lecture on Oct 6: “Alexander the Great: His Career, Character, and What Made Him ‘Great,’” by Jennifer Tobin.

Zoom webinar on Oct 13-15: “Work/Life: Institutions, Subjectivities and Human Resources in the Roman World,” hosted by the NYU Center for Ancient Studies.

HT: Agade, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Joseph Lauer, Explorator, Charles Savelle

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