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Chandler Collins’s latest Jerusalem in Brief summarizes well the major radiocarbon study recently published. He challenges one of the conclusions and notes a preliminary response by Israel Finkelstein.

“A volunteer recently uncovered a colorful and intricately decorated bowl dating back to the Abbasid period of the 9th or 10th century, at Khirbet Hevra near Rehovot.”

Aren Maeir just wrapped up a short spring season excavating at Gath.

A bomb placed at “Joshua’s altar” on Mount Ebal was discovered before anyone was harmed.

Zoom lecture on May 22: “No Place Like Home: Ancient Israelite Houses in Context,” by Cynthia Shafer-Elliott

Biblical Byways is planning a study tour of biblical sites in Israel for September 18-27.

The Aerial Archaeology in Jordan project, now in its 26th season, has more than 180,000 images available online. Management is now being transferred from Britain to Jordan.

Ferrell Jenkins shares a photo he took of sheep grazing along the desert road in Jordan.

HT: Agade, Gordon Franz, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick

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“Newly-deciphered text from ancient scrolls may have finally revealed the location of where Greek philosopher Plato was buried, along with how he really felt about music played at his deathbed.”

Marek Dospěl provides a quick primer of the ancient Egyptian language.

Bible History Daily explains why Egeria’s Travels is such a valuable “source of geographical and historical information.”

Ruth Schuster explores the history of the pomegranate.

The Yale Babylonian Collection has a permanent exhibition space in the Yale Peabody Museum for the first time.

A virtual one-hour tour of Pompeii is being offered on May 23.

Titus Kennedy is a guest on Digging for Truth to discuss archaeological sites in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Persia.

Free this month from Logos: Warfare in the Old Testament: The Organization, Weapons, and Tactics of Ancient Near Eastern Armies, by Boyd Seevers

Bible Mapper Atlas has just produced a poster map of Paul’s travels.

HT: Agade, Gordon Franz, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Joseph Lauer

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An inscription in the synagogue of Susya in the Judean hills may suggest that a messianic community worshipped here.

“The arched stone-built hall in Jerusalem venerated by Christians as the site of Jesus’ Last Supper has been digitally recreated by archaeologists using laser scanners and advanced photography.”

Scott Stripling discusses archaeology related to the Judges on the latest episodes of Digging for Truth (Part 1, Part 2).

Ken Dark: “How Much Did They Really Know? Long-Term Memory, Archaeology and The Topography Of Nazareth

A new ERETZ issue on Caesarea: Queen of the Sea provides an 184-page guide with detailed maps of Herod’s port city.

New release: Ancient Synagogues in Palestine: A Re-evaluation Nearly a Century After Sukenik’s Schweich Lectures, by Jodi Magness (Oxford University Press; £76; allegedly open access, but it doesn’t appear to be available as such yet)

The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library allows you to view high-resolution photos of the scrolls, organized by site, language, and content.

Abigail Leavitt describes what it’s like in Jerusalem these days. She also has traveled recently to Migdal Tzedek, Caesarea, and Tel Dor. Both posts have lots of photos.

Israel’s Good Name recounts his visit to the Te’omim Cave in the Shephelah.

I am grateful for the kind words about the new Genesis photo collection from Luke Chandler, Leon Mauldin, and Charles Savelle.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, Gordon Franz, Paleojudaica

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Archaeologists excavating at Philippi discovered a rare head of Apollo dating to about AD 200.

One of the oldest known codices in existence will be auctioned off in June. The Crosby-Schoyen Codex includes what may be the earliest known texts of 1 Peter and Jonah.

Elizabeth Knott explains how the Yale Babylonian Collection Seal Digitization Project used the latest photographic methods to document more than 14,000 seals and seal impressions. The Yale website has more details.

“Since 2002, more than a hundred ‘new’ Dead Sea Scroll fragments have appeared on the antiquities market. Most of these fragments are tiny and deteriorated and have later been revealed as modern forgeries. Nonetheless, they have been big business. In this database, we have catalogued all of them, providing information about their content, owners, alleged provenance, their place in the biblical corpus, size, and publication history.”

Morteza Arabzadeh Sarbanani explores the question of how Cyrus the Great really died. The article includes several beautiful photographs.

“How to Get a Good Night’s Sleep in Antiquity” is the latest episode on This Week in the Ancient Near East.

Next Stop Italy is hosting a virtual walking tour of the hidden treasures of Roman Assisi.

Phillip J. Long reviews the Lexham Geographical Commentary on the Pentateuch, edited by Barry Beitzel. The review includes a list of the 47 chapter titles and authors. He concludes that “these essays go beyond simple identifications of major locations, often dealing with the fine details of the text and larger biblical-theological questions. This volume will be a welcome addition to the library of any Old Testament student, whether professional or layperson.”

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, Gordon Franz

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“An archaeological site in the Jordan Valley that experts at the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) call a ‘prehistoric Garden of Eden’ was dedicated and opened to the public on Thursday.”

Israel has declared 42 acres surrounding the Herodium to be “state land.”

An unknown Hebrew letter was discovered in a Dead Sea Scroll, according to an announcement of the Academy of the Hebrew Language on April 1.

Abigail Leavitt describes her experience at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher on Easter morning.

Biblical Backgrounds has posted James Monson’s “The Way of the Cross” handout, used in teaching the Passion Weekend in Jerusalem forty years ago.

The top three reports in biblical archaeology in the month of April are a statue of Rameses II, discoveries at a temple at Azekah, and a Phoenician gold pendant found in Jerusalem.

The Times of Israel interviews Martin Goodman about his new book, Herod the Great: Jewish King in a Roman World.

The Spring 2024 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review includes articles on the Jerusalem Ivories, Azekah’s Canaanite temple, a wealthy residence in Jerusalem in the Iron Age, and the possible tomb of one of Jesus’s disciples.

“The twisting turning tales of Jerusalem, particularly of the environs of Agron Street, make for intriguing, compelling, and entertaining listening and viewing.”

Israeli tour guide Shmuel Browns talks about what he has been doing since the Hamas war largely shut down tourism in Israel.

Zoom lecture on April 17: “Searching for Solomon’s City: Recent Excavations at Tel Gezer,” by Steven Ortiz

New release: Kinneret II: Results of the Excavations at Tell el-ʽOrēme, 1994–2008 / Vol. 1: The Bronze Age, Iron Age II, Post-Iron Age Periods, and Other Studies, edited by Wolfgang Zwickel and Juha Pakkala (Ägypten und Altes Testament 120; Zaphon; 160 €)

I will be speaking this Wednesday in Jerusalem University College’s Culture Counts online lecture series on the topic of “The Psalms of David and Solomon.” This is one of my favorite subjects, and I’ll share some of my discoveries both from historical background as well as from the canonical arrangement of the Psalms. The lecture begins at 12:00 Eastern Time and will be followed by a Q&A. Registration is free and includes access to a recording of the lecture.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, Gordon Franz

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“In a ceremonial nod to Purim, the Israel Antiquities Authority has disclosed to the public a ceramic jar fragment bearing a human face and dating back to the Persian period (4th-5th centuries BCE) that was discovered in 2019” in Jerusalem.

A high school student found an oil lamp at Mezad Tzafir that is nearly identical to one discovered by Nelson Glueck ninety years ago at the same location.

Archaeologists discovered a mastaba in an Old Kingdom necropolis at Dahshur.

“Archaeologists in Pompeii have unearthed an ancient building site that sheds light on construction techniques used by the Romans to make iconic structures such as the Colosseum and the Pantheon.”

“The only surviving funerary relief of the ancient Greek world depicting twin babies in the same arms was unveiled at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens and will be exhibited only for a few weeks.”

The British Museum went to court Tuesday against a former curator alleged to have stolen hundreds of artifacts from its collections and offered them for sale online.”

Kazuyuki Hayashi, a professor at Bethel Seminary, has been a supervisor at the Tel Shimron excavation since 2017.

Juan Tebes has been studying pilgrimage routes in the Levant and Hijaz.

Conflicting Jewish traditions place the tomb of Esther and Mordecai in Iran and Israel.

David Moster cut open an old pair of tefillin (phylacteries) to see what Scriptures are inside.

David Hendin, an expert in biblical coins, was interviewed on the Ancient Coin Hour.

Thomas Levy has been honored with a two-volume festschrift featuring research by more than 140 friends and colleagues. (It is a bit pricey, but chapters are available individually.)

The latest issue of Israel Museum Studies in Archaeology is online. One of the articles presents three architectural models from the museum’s collection.

Available for pre-order on Logos: Pondering the Spade: Discussing Important Convergences between Archaeology and Old Testament Studies, by David B. Schreiner

Webinar on April 4: “How did the dead die in Ancient Judah? Death as a social process in Iron Age tombs,” by Matthew Suriano

Webinar on April 18: “Amorites, Their Origins, and Their Legacy,” by Aaron Burke

Sara Japhet, longtime professor at Hebrew University, died this week.

“‘Art of Intimidation: Journey to Ancient Assyria’ is the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East augmented-reality Snapchat lens that brings to life the large casts of sculpted panels from the famed royal palaces of ancient Nineveh and Nimrud.” A video shows how it works.

For the Purim holiday, The Times of Israel profiles a 78-year-old baker who runs the last-of-its-kind Iraqi pastry shop in Israel.

A video of colorized footage from around the world in 1896 includes Jerusalem’s Jaffa Gate, Church of the Holy Sepulcher, West Jerusalem, and train station (start at 2:38).

Leen Ritmeyer explains how the tomb of Jesus was sealed.

Bible Archaeology Report proposes the top ten finds related to the death and resurrection of Jesus.

HT: Agade, Paul Mitchell, Arne Halbakken, Paleojudaica

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