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Chandler Collins’s latest Jerusalem in Brief summarizes well the major radiocarbon study recently published. He challenges one of the conclusions and notes a preliminary response by Israel Finkelstein.

“A volunteer recently uncovered a colorful and intricately decorated bowl dating back to the Abbasid period of the 9th or 10th century, at Khirbet Hevra near Rehovot.”

Aren Maeir just wrapped up a short spring season excavating at Gath.

A bomb placed at “Joshua’s altar” on Mount Ebal was discovered before anyone was harmed.

Zoom lecture on May 22: “No Place Like Home: Ancient Israelite Houses in Context,” by Cynthia Shafer-Elliott

Biblical Byways is planning a study tour of biblical sites in Israel for September 18-27.

The Aerial Archaeology in Jordan project, now in its 26th season, has more than 180,000 images available online. Management is now being transferred from Britain to Jordan.

Ferrell Jenkins shares a photo he took of sheep grazing along the desert road in Jordan.

HT: Agade, Gordon Franz, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick

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If you didn’t know that we released the long-awaited Genesis volume last week, you probably are not subscribed to the BiblePlaces Newsletter.

Circumstances late last year forced us to rebuild the entire subscriber list from scratch, so that could explain why you are not on the new list. Subscribing is free and easy, and you receive two photo sets when you do (140 photos of Herodium and 240 of Philippi).

The Genesis volume is the largest collection of photographs in the Photo Companion to the Bible series (or in any of our 72 volumes of images). Quantity is important in building a library of images, but we haven’t sacrificed quality. Our team started working on Genesis eight years ago, and since then our team has assembled the best photographs of sites, artifacts, reconstructions, maps, and artwork, all with the goal of providing whatever image you need to better understand, illustrate, and explain God’s Word.

Our latest newsletter has all the details, including photographs, endorsements, and a free sample chapter, or you can go directly to ordering the DVD+download or download-only.

The regular price of $149 is reduced for a few more days to an introductory special of $79. Satisfaction is guaranteed, and all future updates to the Genesis volume are free.

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“Architectural remains of the 1,800-year-old Roman VIth ‘Ferrata’ Iron Legion military base were uncovered in a recent excavation carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) at the foot of Tel Megiddo.” But archaeologists are concerned that they will pave it over instead of incorporating it into a larger archaeological park.

Raz Kletter is not convinced there is an inscription on the Mt. Ebal Curse Tablet.

The Jerusalem Post gives a history of the little-known Ein Dor Archaeology Museum.

The latest issue of “Jerusalem in Brief” takes a look at “Kerosine street lamps, a historical photo of Dung Gate, Jerusalem’s lighthouse, and one ridiculously expensive book.” That expensive book is available as a free scan at archive.org.

Registration is now open for the 2024 excavation season at Tel Burna.

Emanuel Tov explains how the copying of Torah scrolls became sacred.

Zoom lecture on Feb 27: “Dawn of the Aleph Beit,” by Orly Goldwasser, Christopher Rollston, and Yossi Garfinkel. This is a panel discussion jointly hosted with the AIAS and British Friends of the Hebrew University.

“The February Bible and Archaeology Fest on February 24 & 25 offers live talks from 13 leading Bible scholars and archaeologists via the Zoom app.” Topics include Phoenicians, Nabateans, Ophel excavations, and sacred prostitution in ancient Corinth. The $149 registration fee includes access to the recordings.

Accordance Bible Software has a sale on graphics resources, with up to 67% off.

The Bible Mapper Atlas has created some new, free maps:

Charles Savelle shares some Valentine’s Day card ideas.

HT: Agade, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken

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A new study of trash and bodily wastes reveals what the Crusaders ate while living in the Holy Land.

Archaeologists have discovered Roman-era mosaics in a rescue operation in southeastern Turkey.

The excavation of a bakery in Pompeii reveals the miserable lives of slaves in the 1st century AD.

Archaeologists have published results of their 13-year excavation of the Roman city of Interamna Lirenas located between Rome and Naples. This article includes many graphics.

A scholar used “psychoacoustics” to understand how the ancient sanctuary of Zeus on Mount Lykaion in Greece was used by visitors.

Bryan Windle offers some thoughts on the controversy regarding the Mount Ebal “curse inscription.”

Nathan Steinmeyer writes about the Iron Age moat recently discovered on the north side of the City of David. Haaretz has a longer report here.

Avi Abrams revisits the debate over the location of King David’s tomb.

Steve Ortiz is on the Biblical World podcast discussing Solomonic gates, the historicity of David and Solomon, and issues in the use and dating of archaeological materials.

James Grieg, who gives a tour of “The Bible in the Ashmolean Museum,” is a guest on The Book and the Spade.

New release: Locating the Tomb and Body of Alexander the Great, by Christian de Vartavan (Projectis, £115; use code DR25 for 25% launch discount)

New release: Jewish Studies on Premodern Periods: A Handbook, edited by Carl S. Ehrlich and Sara R. Horowitz (De Gruyter, $197)

Late Ottoman Turkey in Princeton’s Forgotten Maps, 1883-1923 is a virtual exhibition presented in StoryMaps format by Princeton University Library’s Maps and Geospatial Information Center in partnership with Prof. Richard Talbert at UNC Chapel Hill’s Ancient World Mapping Center.” Part V has now been released.

Accordance is running a 50% off sale on graphic bundles for a few more days. These are very good deals for a load of excellent photo collections and image-rich tools (click through to see all the included modules):

A personal note: If you emailed me on Thursday about preaching through Genesis 1-11, please send me your email again.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, Ted Weis

The Broad Wall in Jerusalem, with newly constructed visitor walkways. Photo by Michael Schneider.

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Haaretz has an update on the season at el-Araj (Bethsaida?) that just concluded. “The archaeologists are not saying they found the house of Peter. They are saying they found a Byzantine basilica that goes back earlier than thought, to the late fifth century, that was built over a ‘venerated wall’ that the builders presumably thought had belonged to the house of Peter. It didn’t, but the wall next to it may have.”

According to a new article in the latest issue of Biblical Archaeology Review written by Chris McKinny and friends, the Millo of Jerusalem was not an earth filling on the slopes of the City of David but the “Spring Tower” guarding the Gihon Spring. The full article is currently available online to all.

Leen Ritmeyer reports on some inscriptions recently discovered inside the Golden Gate in Jerusalem.

Now on Academia: Leen Ritmeyer’s article, “Imagining the Temple Known to Jesus and to Early Jews,” published in The Temple of Jerusalem: From Moses to the Messiah, edited by Steven Fine (Brill, 2011, $227).

The latest issue of Tel Aviv is now available, with several open-access articles including:

In the final episode of the Flora & Faith series, Brad Nelson goes to the wilderness and considers the role of the rotem tree in the story of Elijah. A free study guide for the entire series is also available.

Up to 50,000 bronze coins from the 4th century AD have been discovered off the coast of Sardinia. The coins are in excellent condition.

“Investigators say they have figured out how bronze statues from a shrine built 2,000 years ago in Asia Minor to venerate the emperors of Rome ended up in museums around the world.”

The second set of fully lemmatized Amarna letters has been released on Oracc. “The online edition of the Amarna Letters aims to make transliterations, translations, and glossaries of the letters and administrative texts available to both scholars and the wider public. At this time, the project comprises 305 texts.”

Jonathan Tubb, archaeologist and curator at the British Museum, died in September.

New release: Representations of Writing Materials on Roman Funerary Monuments: Text, Image, Message, edited by Tibor Grüll (Archaeopress, £16-40)

The Albright has a number of fellowships, awards, and internships available for next year. The application deadline is December 1.

This week we released two new volumes in the Photo Companion to the Bible series: Ezra and Nehemiah. These historical books have all kinds of illustrative potential, such that we have on average nearly 200 slides per chapter. They are on sale right now as a set for only $59. We are grateful for the positive response by many, including Luke Chandler, Leon Mauldin, and Charles Savelle.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, G. M. Grena

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A new study claims that Tel Shikmona near Haifa was home to a large Israelite purple dye factory that supplied the prestigious color to Solomon’s temple in Jerusalem from about 850 to 750 BC.

Steve Notley has proposed an explanation for how the New Testament village of Bethsaida came to be known in Arabic as el-Araj, which means “the lame man.”

Abigail Leavitt reports on the final week of excavating at Shiloh, with mention of the discovery of a scarab and a bulla.

Ronit Vered reports on the new exhibition at the Israel Museum entitled “The Feast.”

Joel Kramer has just released a video about the Mesha Stele (Moabite Stone).

The latest episode of Digging for Truth focuses on King Hazael of Aram.

In the latest Biblical World podcast episode, Kyle Keimer discusses Hezekiah’s preparations for the Assyrian invasion, the subject of his dissertation.

The latest edition of Tel Aviv has been published, and a number of the articles are open-access.

Accordance Bible Software has a number of photo collections on sale as well as works from Carta.

Ferrell Jenkins posts some photos of the Dead Sea from his recent trip (also here).

Bryan Windle’s latest archaeological biography is on Aretas IV, the only Nabatean king mentioned in the Bible.

HT: Agade, Ted Weis

Soon visitors to Tel Lachish will have public restrooms to use. There may well also be some displays of artifacts, replicas, or reconstructions.

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