fbpx

Archaeologists working at Saqqara discovered the pyramid of Queen Neith, a queen hitherto unknown in the historical record.

Archaeologists have found the earliest Egyptian tomb oriented to the winter solstice.

“A hoard of gold coins once thought to be fakes have been authenticated by researchers who say the artefacts reveal a long-lost Roman emperor.” The underlying journal article is here. Not all are convinced.

King Tut’s tomb was opened 100 years ago on Thursday.

BBC radio has aired “The Epic of Gilgamesh: A Quest for Immortality,” with Anmar Fadhil discussing the latest discoveries.

Hybrid lecture on Nov 29: “Trade in the Eastern Mediterranean of the 2nd and 1st millennia BCE—A Petrographic Perspective,” by Paula Waiman Barak. (Webex link)

The best-preserved Roman ruins in Morocco are at the site of Volubilis.

New release: “‘Now These Records are Ancient’: Studies in Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical History, Language and Culture in Honor of K. Lawson Younger, Jr.,” edited by James K. Hoffmeier, Richard E. Averbeck, J. Caleb Howard and Wolfgang Zwickel (Zaphon, €128).

National Geographic asked scholars why Noah’s Ark will never be found.

Ben Witherington has several blog entries about his recent trips to Turkey, Israel, Jordan, and Egypt.

Penn Museum has opened its new Eastern Mediterranean Gallery: Crossroads of Culture after an extensive renovation.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Jared Clark, Paleojudaica, Ted Weis

Share:

A Roman ship has been discovered off the coast of Croatia.

Unique olive oil is being produced from an ancient grove at Hadrian’s Villa.

Peter Lacovara disputes the claim that the treasures of King Tut’s tomb would have been dwarfed by those of greater pharaohs. I hope that someone writes a response.

The Bible Archaeology Report has a new well-researched top ten list: Top Ten Historical References to Jesus Outside of the Bible.

New release: The Connected Iron Age: Interregional Networks in the Eastern Mediterranean, 900-600 BCE, edited by Jonathan M. Hall and James F. Osborne (University of Chicago; $45).

New release: From the Passion to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre Memories of Jesus in Place, Pilgrimage, and Early Holy Sites Over the First Three Centuries, by Jordan J. Ryan (T&T Clark; $36; Amazon).

You can compete in BAR’s winter caption contest by submitting a proposal online.

Free download: L’Orient des Bonfils (1867-1918) – a new volume that tells the story of the most active photographic studio in the Middle East. The text is in French, and the majority of the 850-page book are photographs. Click the red button to download the pdf.

The Hellenic Education Research Center offers a number of summer programs. Mark V. Hoffman highly recommends the course on Jews and Early Christians.

With so many free maps now available from Bible Mapper, the new PassageBrowser and MapFinder are welcome tools to quickly find the map you need.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken

Share:

“Archeologists in Egypt have uncovered a vast underground tunnel near the city of Alexandria, and hope it may lead them to the long-lost tomb of Egypt’s last pharaoh and possibly its most famous ruler, Queen Cleopatra VII.”

Archaeologists discovered “an extremely rare and incalculably valuable Roman glass vessel” in a “remarkable state of preservation” in the ancient Roman city of Augustodunum (modern Autun, France).

“Archaeologists in Italy have uncovered more than two dozen beautifully preserved bronze statues dating back to ancient Roman times in thermal baths in Tuscany.”

The Temple of Apollo in Side, Turkey, will be restored as an archaeological museum.

Turkish Archaeological News has a roundup of stories from the month of October, including a report of a well-preserved Byzantine shops and dining area in Ephesus.

The International Herodotus Workshop was held recently in the city of Bodrum, ancient Halicarnassus, the historian’s hometown.

Ádám Németh’s Virtual Reconstructions includes 3D artwork of ancient buildings in Ephesus, including the Celsus Library, Terrace Houses, Trajan’s nymphaeum, theater, agora, and Temple of Artemis.

Digital Maps of the Ancient World: “The aim is to map out all the different aspects of Roman cities so that it can be used as a teaching aid or a guide for those interested in the site.”

“A giant cardboard imitation of the Trojan Horse, which won Greeks the war of Troy in antiquity, broke the Guinness World Record for the world’s largest cardboard sculpture in U.K.”

An American man has returned 19 antiquities to the four countries they came from after reading reports in the Guardian about the repatriation of looted antiquities.”

The Immersive King Tut exhibit is at, or coming to, a dozen US cities.

“Tutankhamun: His Tomb and his Treasures” will open at the Columbus Science Museum on March 18.

On The Book and the Spade, Charles Aling and Gordon Govier discuss King Tut’s Tomb on the 100th anniversary of its discovery.

Leon Mauldin shares a recent photo he took of the Merneptah Stele in the Egyptian Museum.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, Joseph Lauer, Jared Clark, Wayne Stiles, A.D. Riddle, Explorator

Share:

A virtual tour has been posted of the Assyrian canal and rock-reliefs at the Faida Archaeological Park in northern Iraq.

Teach Ancient Egypt is a library of free teaching resources for learners of all kinds. Browse videos, lesson plans, coloring pages, slides, language-learning materials, and more—created and vetted by Egyptologists and other experts.”

“A new exhibition at the British Library explores the diverse and remarkably enduring legends that have sprung up about Alexander [the Great], and the ways successive cultures have shaped stories of him to their own ends.”

A one-minute video gives a preview of the 1st-century Jerusalem model coming to the Ark Encounter.

Classical artworks were originally full of color, and this 6-minute BBC video questions whether that reality has been intentionally suppressed in modern times.

Art & Object lists ten of the most significant underwater finds made in recent decades.

Ferrell Jenkins shares photos of Corinth, Cenchrea, and Isthmia.

John P. Meier, a theologian and biblical commentator who wrote the multi-volume ‘A Marginal Jew,’ died Oct. 18, 2022.”

Burton MacDonald, best known for his survey work in Jordan, died on October 20.

The Bible Society of Taiwan has published a Chinese (Traditional Script) edition of the Satellite Bible Atlas. Also, the English edition is available once again after a delay caused by printer supply chain issues.

HT: Agade, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick

Share:

Behind the Bible (Gesher Media) has released its premiere episode in the Vanished Views series (6 min). Chris McKinny explores a fascinating photo taken in the village of Zerin (biblical Jezreel).

Excavations at Tell Zira’a in northern Jordan point to the presence of an elite class in the Late Bronze Age.

“An International Colloquium on the ancient city of Zoara (also known as Zughar) in the Ghor Safi was inaugurated in Athens on Wednesday.”

“Archaeologists trying to reconstruct an ancient site bulldozed by Daesh terrorists discovered extraordinary 2,700-year-old rock carvings in the ruins in Iraq’s northern city of Mosul.”

The Faida Archaeological Park has opened, and this 1-minute video gives a preview.

“Enheduanna, a Sumerian 3rd millennium BC high priestess, is the focus of an exhibit on the lives of women in Ancient Mesopotamia at The Morgan Library & Museum.

A three-day international symposium on “Yahwism under the Achaemenid Empire” will be held at the University of Haifa on December 20-22.

Zoom lecture on Nov 9: “On Nimrud Bowls and Nimrud Ivories,” by Dirk Wicke

Turkish archaeologists believe that they have discovered the tomb of Saint Nicholas underneath a church in Demre (biblical Myra).

Ferrell Jenkins shares photos of the sacred pool at Hierapolis and the Valley of Lebonah.

Harvard Magazine has a profile of George Reisner, excavator of Samaria and 23 archaeological sites in Egypt and Sudan. Harvard naturally calls Reisner out for not being ahead of his time in his colonialist attitude.

Full transcripts of all episodes from the Thin End of the Wedge podcast are now available.

HT: Agade, Charles Savelle, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Ted Weis

Share:

Israel plans to build hotels, guest villas, and a conference center on manmade islands in the Dead Sea.

Archaeologists carrying out a survey on Mount Zion discovered a graffiti inscription of Knight Adrian von Bubenberg, a Swiss hero who made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1466.

“The 2022 International Bible Marathon was held over the Sukkot holiday in the Shiloh bloc of communities in Samaria, with both its starting and ending points in Ancient Shiloh.”

The Caesarea Maritima International Conference 2022 runs from Sunday to Wednesday. A full program is online, and both in-person and webinar attendance is free. The lectures of Hohlfelder, Burrell, and Schiffman look particularly interesting.

Gordon Govier interviews Steve Ortiz, Cynthia Shafer-Elliott, and Jonathan Greer about Israel’s ArchaeoTourism Initiative.

It’s not April 1st, but you wouldn’t know it from the Jerusalem Post’s story identifying Solomon as Pharaoh Shishak.

Jonathan Klawans takes his readers to Tel Dan in the Site-Seeing column in the latest issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.

Saar Tauber Tamir suggests five places to visit in Israel that are not as well-known.

The latest episode of This Week in the Ancient Near East looks at the ivory furniture decorations recently discovered in Jerusalem.

The Friends of ASOR Tour to Israel next year visits 27 sites and museums in 13 days, with an impressive list of tour guides. The website describes the full program.

New release: The Ancient Israelite World, edited by Kyle H. Keimer and George A. Pierce (Routledge, $200; Amazon)

Chris McKinny’s My People as Your People: A Textual and Archaeological Analysis of the Reign of Jehoshaphat is marked down to $9 now on Amazon, from $80 (hardcover). I suspect after a few copies sell, the price will jump back up.

Online courses have been announced for JUC’s spring semester, including:

  • Archaeology of the Galilee, with Chris McKinny and Kyle Keimer
  • Geographical Voices in the Psalms, with Paul Wright
  • Literature of Ancient Israel’s Neighbors, with Bryan Beyer
  • Physical Settings of the Bible, with Chandler Collins

Classes are beginning soon at the Biblical Language Center (Randall Buth) and the Jerusalem Seminary.

My topic on the latest episode of Digging for Truth is “The Bible and the Karnak Temple.”

HT: Agade, Charles Savelle, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Ted Weis

Share: