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Two statues believed to be dating back to 2,000 years were unearthed during excavation works in the ancient Roman city of Blaundus in western Turkey.”

Five marble statue heads from the Hellenistic and Roman periods were discovered in excavations at Cnidus (Knidos).

A 4,000-year-old mound and an architectural structure inside it have been unearthed after the water level of Atatürk Dam receded 15 meters in the southeastern province of Adıyaman.”

“The Temple of Venus and Roma, located in the Roman Forum opposite the Colosseum, has undergone a €2.5 million restoration sponsored by the luxury fashion house Fendi.”

Biblical Archaeology Review has posted its annual list of dig opportunities for 2022. The Biblical Archaeology Society is offering dig scholarships of $2,000.

The first-ever Spring Bible and Archaeology Fest will be held on April 2 and 3.

“Left in ruins by jihadists, Iraq’s once-celebrated Mosul museum and its 2,500-year-old treasures are being given a second life.”

Austen Henry Layard, renowned as the excavator of Nimrud, used his archaeological fame to catapult him into a career of politics and diplomacy.

The National Library of Israel has a new section on its website to share manuscripts from St. Catherine’s Monastery and related materials.

The final reports for the Tall Zirā‘a / Gadara Region Project have now been published. The volumes are also available in pdf format for free.

New exhibition at New York University: Pompeii in Color: The Life of Roman Painting (Jan 26 to May 29).

BBC Radio episode on the Hittites: “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the empire based in the Land of Hatti during the Late Bronze Age, in modern Turkey, and the discoveries there over the last century.”

Carl Rasmussen begins a series on anchor stocks discovered at Malta and their possible relationship to Paul’s shipwreck.

Lectures from La Sierra University’s recent Archaeology Discovery Weekend are now online, including these two by Mark Wilson:

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Charles Savelle, Explorator

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Marine archaeologists working near Caesarea have discovered a gold ring with a green gemstone depicting the “Good Shepherd,” a red gemstone depicting a lyre, and a hoard of Roman coins. A 2-minute video announcing the discoveries has been produced by the IAA.

“New research suggests that the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate is the one that built the Biar Aqueduct, the most sophisticated ancient aqueduct of the Jerusalem area” and the main one supplying Solomon’s Pools (Haaretz premium). The underlying journal article is available on Academia.

“Archaeologists say discovery at Tel Tsaf in the Jordan Valley is first known instance of alcohol being imbibed inside a community in the ancient Middle East.”

Authorities found the lid of a Roman sarcophagus in a garbage dump in Ashkelon.

The Jerusalem Post runs a brief story on the legend of the ark of the covenant being brought to Ethiopia.

The Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem has added a number of new programs and educational opportunities in the last year.

This Week in the Ancient Near East podcast: “Even More New Amazing Iron Age Finds from a Cult Site West of Jerusalem, or, To Gaze Upon the Knees of God”

A recent video of the Temple Mount shows the interior of the Golden Gate now furnished as a mosque.

The Conversation provides an explainer on what it is like to volunteer on an archaeological excavation.

The second episode in the “State of Jerusalem” miniseries by The Times of Israel looks at the Christian community in the city.

The Israeli government has again cancelled Christmas in the Holy Land for most, but not all, tourists.

Chris McKinny and Kyle Keimer discuss the history and archaeology of Christmas on the Biblical World podcast.

Andy Cook at Experience Israel Now has created a two-part special entitled “The Journey to Christmas.” Part One came out a few days ago, and Part Two will be released tomorrow. The videos include drone footage of the route that Joseph and Mary took from Nazareth to Bethlehem.

We’ll have a part 2 for this roundup on Sunday.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Charles Savelle, Explorator

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The first example of Roman crucifixion in northern Europe has been discovered. The skeleton of a man with a nail through his right heel was uncovered in a cemetery near Cambridge that dates to the 3rd or 4th century AD. The underlying article, published by British Archaeology, is available in pdf format.

Archaeologists working at the Temple of Hatshepsut in Luxor have discovered hundreds of items in an ancient garbage dump.

Two more mummies with tongues wrapped in golden foil have been discovered in Egypt.

Kathleen Martinez has spent the last 15 years determined to find Cleopatra’s tomb.

A new study suggests ancient Egyptian elites drank thick porridge-like beer.

Leather scale armor from the Neo-Assyrian empire has been discovered in China.

Archaeological work is being carried out in Iraq by a number of foreign teams.

One of the world’s largest collectors of ancient art has surrendered 180 looted antiquities. Nearly 50 of those will be returned to Greece soon.

A tablet with the Epic of Gilgamesh has been returned to Iraq after being looted from a museum during the 1991 war.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day report for November’s stories.

Carl Rasmussen has posted some photos of the new “Museum in the Istanbul Airport.”

William J. Fulco died in late November.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Richard Bauckham, Paleojudaica, Explorator

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“The Egyptian-German mission has uncovered a collection of decorated blocks and fragments from the King Nactanebo [Nectanebo] I temple at the Matariya archaeological site in Heliopolis.”

A perfectly intact room that was lived in by slaves has been discovered in a suburb of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.” There is a 1-minute video here.

Archaeologists have discovered an latrine in the ancient theater of Izmir (biblical Smyrna), probably intended for use by actors.

“New excavations at the site of Blaundus in western Turkey are shedding light on the burial practices of ancient Asia Minor.”

Hurriyet Daily News has a short story on the use of healing bowls in antiquity.

Excavations of the Mycenean necropolis of ancient Rhypes has revealed various assemblages of grave goods and bronze swords.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day roundup of archaeological discoveries throughout the country in October, including the discovery of a 1st century altar at Alexandria Troas.

Giorgia Baldacci explains how clues from the cultural context of the Phaistos Disc support its authenticity and help to date it to 1750 BC.

George Athas discusses the intertestamental period on the Undeceptions podcast.

Microsoft has teamed up with the Greek government to digitally preserve ancient Olympia.

The Roman denarius has influenced currency throughout the Mediterranean world for the last two thousand years.

Rome’s Barberini Mithraeum, a mysterious cavern dating to the third century AD, is to reopen to visitors every second and fourth Saturday of the month, from 13 November.”

The 23rd season of excavations has begun at the site of ancient Ecbatana, capital of the Medes.

Upcoming trips of interest with Tutku Tours:

  • In Paul’s Footsteps in Turkey, with Mark Wilson (Apr-May 2022)
  • By Sea & Land: Paul’s Journey to Rome, with Charl Rasmussen and Glen Thompson (Apr-May 2022)
  • Seven Churches of Revelation and John of Patmos (Jay-June 2022)
  • Greece & Turkey: The Cradle of Christianity, with Mark Fairchild (July 2022)
  • Paul at Illyricum, with Mark Wilson (Sept 2022)
  • Sailing Acts: The Seaports and Sailing Routes of Paul, with Linford and Janet Stutzman (Sept 2022)

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Explorator

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A new study suggests that Sennacherib’s army collected three million stones in order to construct the massive siege ramp at Lachish in about 25 days.

Researchers studying dolmen fields in southern Jordan discovered several unfinished dolmens, providing insights into how these megalithic tombs were constructed.

Authorities have recovered more than 6,000 ancient coins from the owner of a jewelry store in Ashkelon.

“Why is a citrus fruit – also known in Hebrew as etrog – featured in the magnificent mosaic paving the main hall of a caliphate castle in Jericho?”

La Sierra University’s Archaeology Discovery Weekend is being held today and tomorrow with the theme, “Southwest Turkey: Famous Cities, Churches, and Synagogues.”

In the latest episode of the Biblical World podcast, “Kyle and Chris interview Erez Ben-Yosef (Tel Aviv University) concerning his work on the 11th through 9th century BC copper industry in the Arabah of Israel and Jordan.”

Jordan is eager to end its tourism slump, and the recent filming of movies including Dune, Aladdin, and Star Wars: Rogue One may help to attract visitors.

Zoom lecture on Nov 15: “Coin Deposits: From Ancient Synagogues in Late Antique Palestine,” by Tine Rassalle

Zoom lecture on Dec 2: “Synagogues as Jesus Knew Them,” by James R. Strange

New release: Excavations in the City of David, Jerusalem (1995-2010), by Ronny Reich and Eli Shukron

New release: To Explore the Land of Canaan: Studies in Biblical Archaeology in Honor of Jeffrey R. Chadwick, edited by Aren M. Maeir and George A. Pierce (DeGruyter, $100)

Registration has opened for the 2022 season at Tel Burna.

The Institute of Biblical Culture is now taking registrations for a beginning course in Biblical Hebrew starting in January.

The Top Ten Discoveries Related to Joshua and the Conquest includes some familiar finds and some new ones. With 53 footnotes, this is a well-researched summary that will very useful for many.

The video downloads and conference notebook for the Infusion Bible Conference on Paul and His Roman World are now available for purchase. This is a valuable resource.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Explorator

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“Archaeologists have unearthed the tomb of Ptah-M-Wia, who served as head of the treasury under Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II.”

Archaeologists are discovering Byzantine remains after a modern palace in Luxor was torn down.

Claims that a second Sphinx statue has been discovered near the Giza pyramids are not true, according to Zahi Hawass.

The Arch of Janus in Rome will open to the public for the first time in 28 years.

“Warming relations between Israel and Arab countries creates new application for Aravrit, script that combines Hebrew and Arabic.”

The schedule for ASOR’s 2021 Annual Meeting is now online.

Kyle Keimer has joined Biblical Israel Ministries and Tours, and he has begun a “Why” series on the blog, starting with Jerusalem.

Montagu Parker’s great-great-niece writes about her discovery that six books are being written about her infamous relative’s ill-fated expedition to Jerusalem.

Israel’s mortuary beliefs are the subject of Matt Suriano’s conversation with Chris McKinny and Kyle Keimer on the Biblical World podcast.

Clyde Billington and Gordon Govier discuss the latest discoveries in biblical archaeology on The Book and the Spade.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken

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