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“The Egyptian-German mission has uncovered a collection of decorated blocks and fragments from the King Nactanebo [Nectanebo] I temple at the Matariya archaeological site in Heliopolis.”

A perfectly intact room that was lived in by slaves has been discovered in a suburb of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.” There is a 1-minute video here.

Archaeologists have discovered an latrine in the ancient theater of Izmir (biblical Smyrna), probably intended for use by actors.

“New excavations at the site of Blaundus in western Turkey are shedding light on the burial practices of ancient Asia Minor.”

Hurriyet Daily News has a short story on the use of healing bowls in antiquity.

Excavations of the Mycenean necropolis of ancient Rhypes has revealed various assemblages of grave goods and bronze swords.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day roundup of archaeological discoveries throughout the country in October, including the discovery of a 1st century altar at Alexandria Troas.

Giorgia Baldacci explains how clues from the cultural context of the Phaistos Disc support its authenticity and help to date it to 1750 BC.

George Athas discusses the intertestamental period on the Undeceptions podcast.

Microsoft has teamed up with the Greek government to digitally preserve ancient Olympia.

The Roman denarius has influenced currency throughout the Mediterranean world for the last two thousand years.

Rome’s Barberini Mithraeum, a mysterious cavern dating to the third century AD, is to reopen to visitors every second and fourth Saturday of the month, from 13 November.”

The 23rd season of excavations has begun at the site of ancient Ecbatana, capital of the Medes.

Upcoming trips of interest with Tutku Tours:

  • In Paul’s Footsteps in Turkey, with Mark Wilson (Apr-May 2022)
  • By Sea & Land: Paul’s Journey to Rome, with Charl Rasmussen and Glen Thompson (Apr-May 2022)
  • Seven Churches of Revelation and John of Patmos (Jay-June 2022)
  • Greece & Turkey: The Cradle of Christianity, with Mark Fairchild (July 2022)
  • Paul at Illyricum, with Mark Wilson (Sept 2022)
  • Sailing Acts: The Seaports and Sailing Routes of Paul, with Linford and Janet Stutzman (Sept 2022)

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Explorator

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A new study suggests that Sennacherib’s army collected three million stones in order to construct the massive siege ramp at Lachish in about 25 days.

Researchers studying dolmen fields in southern Jordan discovered several unfinished dolmens, providing insights into how these megalithic tombs were constructed.

Authorities have recovered more than 6,000 ancient coins from the owner of a jewelry store in Ashkelon.

“Why is a citrus fruit – also known in Hebrew as etrog – featured in the magnificent mosaic paving the main hall of a caliphate castle in Jericho?”

La Sierra University’s Archaeology Discovery Weekend is being held today and tomorrow with the theme, “Southwest Turkey: Famous Cities, Churches, and Synagogues.”

In the latest episode of the Biblical World podcast, “Kyle and Chris interview Erez Ben-Yosef (Tel Aviv University) concerning his work on the 11th through 9th century BC copper industry in the Arabah of Israel and Jordan.”

Jordan is eager to end its tourism slump, and the recent filming of movies including Dune, Aladdin, and Star Wars: Rogue One may help to attract visitors.

Zoom lecture on Nov 15: “Coin Deposits: From Ancient Synagogues in Late Antique Palestine,” by Tine Rassalle

Zoom lecture on Dec 2: “Synagogues as Jesus Knew Them,” by James R. Strange

New release: Excavations in the City of David, Jerusalem (1995-2010), by Ronny Reich and Eli Shukron

New release: To Explore the Land of Canaan: Studies in Biblical Archaeology in Honor of Jeffrey R. Chadwick, edited by Aren M. Maeir and George A. Pierce (DeGruyter, $100)

Registration has opened for the 2022 season at Tel Burna.

The Institute of Biblical Culture is now taking registrations for a beginning course in Biblical Hebrew starting in January.

The Top Ten Discoveries Related to Joshua and the Conquest includes some familiar finds and some new ones. With 53 footnotes, this is a well-researched summary that will very useful for many.

The video downloads and conference notebook for the Infusion Bible Conference on Paul and His Roman World are now available for purchase. This is a valuable resource.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Explorator

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“Archaeologists have unearthed the tomb of Ptah-M-Wia, who served as head of the treasury under Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II.”

Archaeologists are discovering Byzantine remains after a modern palace in Luxor was torn down.

Claims that a second Sphinx statue has been discovered near the Giza pyramids are not true, according to Zahi Hawass.

The Arch of Janus in Rome will open to the public for the first time in 28 years.

“Warming relations between Israel and Arab countries creates new application for Aravrit, script that combines Hebrew and Arabic.”

The schedule for ASOR’s 2021 Annual Meeting is now online.

Kyle Keimer has joined Biblical Israel Ministries and Tours, and he has begun a “Why” series on the blog, starting with Jerusalem.

Montagu Parker’s great-great-niece writes about her discovery that six books are being written about her infamous relative’s ill-fated expedition to Jerusalem.

Israel’s mortuary beliefs are the subject of Matt Suriano’s conversation with Chris McKinny and Kyle Keimer on the Biblical World podcast.

Clyde Billington and Gordon Govier discuss the latest discoveries in biblical archaeology on The Book and the Spade.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken

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A gold ring with an amethyst stone was discovered at an excavation of a 7th-century winepress at Yavne.

A recent study reveals much about the lives of four individuals who died in a burning building in Azekah around 1200 BC. The underlying journal article is available for purchase here.

More people have surreptitiously visited the caves underneath the Machpelah of Hebron than is widely known. Some of the history and findings given in Noam Arnon’s doctoral thesis is reported in Israel HaYom. A previously published diagram is here. If anyone has access to the thesis, let me know.

The Daily Mail has some beautiful photos of the impressive mosaic floors at Hisham’s Palace in Jericho.

Meir Edrey, Adi Erlich, and Assaf Yasur-Landau write about the 1972 discovery of the Shavei Zion figurine assemblage, found underwater north of Acco.

Erez Ben-Yosef argues that the search for archaeological evidence for David’s kingdom needs to shift from looking for magnificent buildings to looking for a tent-dwelling population. A related journal article by the author is here.

Rosella Tercatin provides a minor update on the renovations at Jerusalem’s Tower of David Museum. A previous version of this story posted earlier this week contains additional details.

Detailed satellite imagery of Israel is now publicly available, though Google Earth/Maps does not seem to have updated to it yet.

Andy Cook of Experience Israel Now provides subscribers to the “Photo of the Day” with images and maps of biblical sites and recent discoveries.

Andrew Lawler reviews some of the archaeological background to the religious conflict in Jerusalem.

Luke Chandler likes the latest additions to the Photo Companion to the Bible series.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken

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Israel opened up to individual tourists yesterday for the first time in 18 months, and all are hopeful that no more tour groups or individuals will have to cancel their trips.

One of our teammates who lives in Jerusalem, Christian Locatell, went for a walk with his kids through Hezekiah’s Tunnel, and on the way back he discovered that much of the “Pilgrim’s Road” between the Pool of Siloam and the Temple Mount is now open to the public. He sent a few photos. This walk on this 1st-century street is worth adding to your next itinerary.

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“The ancient Egyptians were carrying out sophisticated mummifications of their dead 1,000 years earlier than previously thought.”

“A shipwreck carrying Greek ceramics from the 7th century BC, discovered in Italy in 2019, sheds new light on Magna Graecia, the area of southern Italy that was settled by the Greeks.”

The Roman theater of Ankara has been rediscovered in recent years.

Excavations have revealed the largest Byzantine mosaic structure in central Turkey.

Over 100 seal impressions dating to the Hittite Empire were found at Carchemish. Most of the impressions belong to a female administrator named Matiya. Other finds included a seal impression of Piradu from the Middle Assyrian kingdom, an Iron Age cemetery from the 8th-7th centuries BC, and a tomb stela dating to the reign of King Kamani from the 8th century BC.

Archaeologists have discovered a large Assyrian wine factory from the time of Sargon II and Sennacherib. The associated discovery of royal reliefs was previously announced last year.

“Analysis of DNA from ancient remains on the Greek island of Crete suggests the Minoans were indigenous Europeans.”

Smithsonian Magazine posts an account of Montague Parker’s shenanigans in Jerusalem, adapted from Andrew Lawler’s new Underground Jerusalem: The Buried History of the World’s Most Contested City.

The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is using technology to enhance the visitor’s experience, including the creation of an animated film to explain the significance of the shift from black figure vase painting to red figure vase panting circa 500 BC.

New from Eisenbrauns: Camels in the Biblical World, by Martin Heide and Joris Peters. Save 30% with code NR21.

New release: The Prophets of Israel: Walking the Ancient Paths, by James K. Hoffmeier, with many of our photos as well as beautiful maps created by A.D. Riddle.

Logos Bible Software users might be interested in the addition of pronunciation to Biblical Places and Biblical Things in the Factbook resource.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Charles Savelle, Daniel Wright, Paleojudaica, Ted Weis, A.D. Riddle

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