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Excavations revealed an ancient synagogue in Side near Antalya (biblical Attalia), a city where Paul preached, albeit six centuries after his visit.

“A team of researchers has successfully digitally unwrapped the mummified body of the pharaoh Amenhotep I, who lived around 3,500 years ago.”

Mark Boslough claims that the Sodom cosmic airburst theory has significant shortcomings.

108-year-old Sumerologist credits Istanbul museum for long career.”

“A digital model of Babylon is under development.”

Virtual workshop on January 11 at the Albright Institute: The Religious Soundscape of the Holy Land: From the Crusades to the Late Ottoman Empire

Webinar on January 20: “The Not-So-Innocents Abroad: The Beginnings of American Biblical Archaeology,” by Rachel Hallote

Carl Rasmussen writes about an anchor stock at Malta with the name of an Egyptian deity on it.

John DeLancey and Kyle Keimer give a virtual tour of highlights in the archaeological wing of the Israel Museum (part 1 of 4).

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Alexander Schick, Arne Halbakken, Charles Savelle

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Two statues believed to be dating back to 2,000 years were unearthed during excavation works in the ancient Roman city of Blaundus in western Turkey.”

Five marble statue heads from the Hellenistic and Roman periods were discovered in excavations at Cnidus (Knidos).

A 4,000-year-old mound and an architectural structure inside it have been unearthed after the water level of Atatürk Dam receded 15 meters in the southeastern province of Adıyaman.”

“The Temple of Venus and Roma, located in the Roman Forum opposite the Colosseum, has undergone a €2.5 million restoration sponsored by the luxury fashion house Fendi.”

Biblical Archaeology Review has posted its annual list of dig opportunities for 2022. The Biblical Archaeology Society is offering dig scholarships of $2,000.

The first-ever Spring Bible and Archaeology Fest will be held on April 2 and 3.

“Left in ruins by jihadists, Iraq’s once-celebrated Mosul museum and its 2,500-year-old treasures are being given a second life.”

Austen Henry Layard, renowned as the excavator of Nimrud, used his archaeological fame to catapult him into a career of politics and diplomacy.

The National Library of Israel has a new section on its website to share manuscripts from St. Catherine’s Monastery and related materials.

The final reports for the Tall Zirā‘a / Gadara Region Project have now been published. The volumes are also available in pdf format for free.

New exhibition at New York University: Pompeii in Color: The Life of Roman Painting (Jan 26 to May 29).

BBC Radio episode on the Hittites: “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the empire based in the Land of Hatti during the Late Bronze Age, in modern Turkey, and the discoveries there over the last century.”

Carl Rasmussen begins a series on anchor stocks discovered at Malta and their possible relationship to Paul’s shipwreck.

Lectures from La Sierra University’s recent Archaeology Discovery Weekend are now online, including these two by Mark Wilson:

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Alexander Schick, Charles Savelle, Explorator

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The first example of Roman crucifixion in northern Europe has been discovered. The skeleton of a man with a nail through his right heel was uncovered in a cemetery near Cambridge that dates to the 3rd or 4th century AD. The underlying article, published by British Archaeology, is available in pdf format.

Archaeologists working at the Temple of Hatshepsut in Luxor have discovered hundreds of items in an ancient garbage dump.

Two more mummies with tongues wrapped in golden foil have been discovered in Egypt.

Kathleen Martinez has spent the last 15 years determined to find Cleopatra’s tomb.

A new study suggests ancient Egyptian elites drank thick porridge-like beer.

Leather scale armor from the Neo-Assyrian empire has been discovered in China.

Archaeological work is being carried out in Iraq by a number of foreign teams.

One of the world’s largest collectors of ancient art has surrendered 180 looted antiquities. Nearly 50 of those will be returned to Greece soon.

A tablet with the Epic of Gilgamesh has been returned to Iraq after being looted from a museum during the 1991 war.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day report for November’s stories.

Carl Rasmussen has posted some photos of the new “Museum in the Istanbul Airport.”

William J. Fulco died in late November.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Richard Bauckham, Paleojudaica, Explorator

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Remains discovered at Herculaneum have led an archaeologist to compare the eruption of Mount Vesuvius to the WWII bomb at Hiroshima.

A large Roman villa complex with a mosaic depicting scenes from The Iliad has been uncovered in Britain.

Two Late Bronze tombs excavated in Hala Sultan Tekke in Cyprus have revealed more than 500 objects, including gold jewelry and gemstones.

A 1,600-year-old steelyard weight has been discovered during the ongoing excavations in the ancient city of Hadrianopolis” in northern Turkey.

Carl Rasmussen recently visited Sardis and photographed some of the changes being made to the site.

Underwater archaeology is thriving in Turkey, with 10 underwater excavations carried out this year alone.

The Greek Reporter has a story on Veria (Berea in the New Testament) which is also known as “Little Jerusalem.”

The latest episode on the Greece Declassified podcast considers whether the Hittites were an influence on Homer.

Now online: The Karkemish 3D Visualization Project

A new exhibition entitled “Child-friendly: Growing up in ancient Rome” opened recently in Florence, Italy.

Carolyn Wilke has written “a brief scientific history of glass” for Smithsonian Magazine.

Owen Jarus explains why the Egyptians stopped building pyramids.

Gil Davis provides a short history of the rise of silver coinage.

The world’s largest brick-built arch, the sixth-century Arch of Ctesiphon in Iraq, is now being restored.

The Nineveh Medical Encyclopaedia “represents the world’s first standardised, structured and systematised handbook on therapeutic medicine.”

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Arne Halbakken, Explorator, Ted Weis

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“An ancient seal thought to belong to a Hittite prince and an ancient cuneiform tablet, both dating back over three millennia, were discovered in Turkey’s southern Hatay province.”

An iron face mask that would have been worn by an accomplished member of the Roman cavalry some 1,800 years ago has been unearthed in northern central Turkey.”

A study in the Temple of Hatshepsut reveals the production process for the reliefs, including the role of apprentices.

“Archaeologists conducting works at the Temple of Hatshepsut have made new discoveries in a subterranean tomb.”

Egypt has celebrated the reopening of the Avenue of the Sphinxes.

The Grand Egyptian Museum continues to receive artifacts, including 52 monumental pieces and 16 from King Tut’s treasures.

AramcoWorld has a series on spice migrations, including articles on ginger, cumin, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, and cinnamon.

Russia has begun the long process of restoring the ancient Arch of Triumph in Palmyra after it was destroyed by evil people.

A fortress from the empire of the Medes has been discovered in northeastern Iran.

Two spectacular gold Persian reliefs, once owned by the Shah of Iran, will be auctioned by Christies on December 8.

Greek City Times has a review of the 18 World Heritage Sites in Greece.

A 2,000-year-old mosaic that once belonged to Caligula and disappeared during World War II was recovered in New York City after it served as a coffee table for 50 years.

Italy has launched a cultural streaming platform.

The New Yorker has a feature story on the latest discoveries at Pompeii.

It’s apparently not OK for American tourists to break into the Colosseum at night to drink beer.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Charles Savelle, Explorator

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Archaeologists in Egypt have found proof that they are excavating a rare ancient sun temple, the third ever found and the first to be uncovered in 50 years.”

After a ten-year closure, Egypt has begun plans to restore the Aswan Museum on Elephantine Island.

Saudi Arabia has opened the Nabatean site of Hegra to foreign tourists for the first time ever. This detailed article about Petra’s little sister includes many beautiful photos.

Four known Mycenaean corbel arch bridges in the vicinity of Mycenae and Arkadiko villages in Greece are considered to be some of the world’s oldest bridges. Two of them are still in operation and have been so for at least 3,000 years.”

Lina Zeldovich has written the best article I’ve ever read on bathroom practices of ancient Romans.

Now online: “Propaganda, Power, and Perversion of Biblical Truths: Coins Illustrating the Book of Revelation,” by Gordon Franz

It is interesting to see the Tehran Times run a story about Susa without ignoring its role biblical history. (The Bible is effectively outlawed in Iran, and all websites related to the Bible, including this one, cannot be accessed.)

The Biblical Archaeology Society has announced its 2021 Publication Awards Winners.

“Holly Beers and David deSilva discuss life in the first century with Biblical World host Lynn Cohick. Holly and David both wrote novels that explore life on the ground in Ephesus, giving readers a unique opportunity to experience Paul’s world in a very personal way.”

HT: Agade, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Keith Keyser, Andy Cook

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