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Weekend Roundup

Archaeologists working in Kurdistan have exposed ten new rock inscriptions from the reign of Sargon II. There are some excellent photos here.

A 7th-grader walking near Caesarea after heavy rains discovered a Byzantine inscription.

Archaeologists are studying a cave in southern Sinai with colorful inscriptions from the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods.

Scott Stripling believes that the archaeological material discovered in recent excavations at Shiloh supports the existence of the tabernacle at the site. This includes altar horns, bones of sacrificed animals, pomegranate figurines, storage rooms, and a permanent cultic platform.

Researchers used an algorithm to determine that 31 of the Samaria Ostraca were written by two people. These date from early in the reign of Jeroboam II. The journal article is available here.

A new study challenges the theory that the eruption of Mount Vesuvius vaporized the blood and brains of the inhabitants of Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Recent investigation indicates that olive horticulture in the southern Levant began in approximately 2500 BC.

A new study suggests that the rise and fall of the Neo-Assyrian Empire correlates with heavy rainfall followed by a megadrought.

Aaron Koller explains various theories concerning the origin and earliest use of the alphabet.

Leon Mauldin looks at references to Hadad and Ben-Hadad in the Bible, and he shares a photo from the Jordan Museum.

Bryan Windle does another great job with his archaeological biography of Shishak.

The National Archaeology Museum in Athens is slated to undergo a major renovation.

A new exhibit at the Bible Lands Museum in Jerusalem focuses on the kingdoms of South Arabia, including Sheba, Qataban, Hadhramaut, and Ma’in.”

The “Faces of Jesus” exhibit at Columbia Bible College will be closing soon.

A workshop will be held at the Albright on January 30, 4-6 pm: “Biblical Imagery in the Late Antique Synagogues of the Galilee.”

Christopher Siwicki writes about Nero’s Golden Palace, recently opened to the public.

An Italian diplomat has been convicted in absentia for smuggling Egyptian antiquities.

High-quality archaeological reproductions will now be sold in Egyptian airports.

An ancient Roman cookbook provides insights into the diet of those living in the first centuries after Christ.

New: Digging Up Jericho: Past, Present and Future, edited by Rachael Thyrza Sparks, Bill Finlayson, Bart Wagemakers, and Josef Mario Briffa.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Explorator, Chris McKinny, Alexander Schick

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About the BiblePlaces Blog

The BiblePlaces Blog provides updates and analysis of the latest in biblical archaeology, history, and geography. Unless otherwise noted, the posts are written by Todd Bolen, PhD, Professor of Biblical Studies at The Master’s University.

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