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Weekend Roundup, Part 2

The first example of Roman crucifixion in northern Europe has been discovered. The skeleton of a man with a nail through his right heel was uncovered in a cemetery near Cambridge that dates to the 3rd or 4th century AD. The underlying article, published by British Archaeology, is available in pdf format.

Archaeologists working at the Temple of Hatshepsut in Luxor have discovered hundreds of items in an ancient garbage dump.

Two more mummies with tongues wrapped in golden foil have been discovered in Egypt.

Kathleen Martinez has spent the last 15 years determined to find Cleopatra’s tomb.

A new study suggests ancient Egyptian elites drank thick porridge-like beer.

Leather scale armor from the Neo-Assyrian empire has been discovered in China.

Archaeological work is being carried out in Iraq by a number of foreign teams.

One of the world’s largest collectors of ancient art has surrendered 180 looted antiquities. Nearly 50 of those will be returned to Greece soon.

A tablet with the Epic of Gilgamesh has been returned to Iraq after being looted from a museum during the 1991 war.

Turkish Archaeological News has a day-by-day report for November’s stories.

Carl Rasmussen has posted some photos of the new “Museum in the Istanbul Airport.”

William J. Fulco died in late November.

HT: Agade, Joseph Lauer, Ted Weis, Arne Halbakken, Richard Bauckham, Paleojudaica, Explorator

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About the BiblePlaces Blog

The BiblePlaces Blog provides updates and analysis of the latest in biblical archaeology, history, and geography. Unless otherwise noted, the posts are written by Todd Bolen, PhD, Professor of Biblical Studies at The Master’s University.

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